Bringing Identity into the Clinic: Investigating Identity Negotiation in Psychosis

Lead Research Organisation: Queen Mary, University of London
Department Name: Wolfson Institute

Abstract

Maev's research focuses on how experiencing psychosis and receiving a diagnosis may affect patients' identity and sense of belonging to different groups, and identify if and how identity negotiation processes are linked to clinical outcomes. Her research aims to translate insights from social psychology into methodological tools to study identity negotiation processes in people with psychosis, link them to outcomes and develop guidelines for good practice. Research questions will include: How has identity change and negotiation been described in the mental health literature? How do people describe the experience of identity negotiation following a diagnosis of psychosis? How can processes of identity negotiation be measured quantitatively in a way that is understandable and meaningful to patients? Are identity negotiation processes linked to health outcomes (quality of life and social situation)?

Publications

10 25 50

Studentship Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Student Name
ES/P000703/1 01/10/2017 30/09/2027
1917463 Studentship ES/P000703/1 01/10/2017 31/03/2021 Mebh Margaret Conneely McInerney
 
Description The first piece of work that was part of this project was to carry out a systematic review and narrative synthesis of identity change in psychosis. A conceptual framework was created comprising five ways of understanding identity change in psychosis. The completion of this systematic review and creation of the conceptual framework of identity change in psychosis was the first objective of the project, which has now been met.
The second piece of work was to conduct a cross-sectional survey exploring social identity and quality of life in people with psychosis.
The third piece of work was to conduct interview with people who have experience psychosis about their understandings of social identity and changes in social identity.
Exploitation Route The findings of the systematic review and narrative synthesis can be taken forward in clinical practice and in research (the findings can be found at the url above, published in Schizophrenia Bulletin). The five ways of understanding identity change that make up the conceptual framework might help clinicians explore with patients the ways identity changes might be experienced, and for researchers the framework can be used as a way for researchers to orient themselves in the existing literature. The framework could be expanded and adapted to other settings.
The findings of the second study, the quantitative survey, indicate that there are associations between quality of life and social identity features in people with psychosis, whereas social contact is not associated to quality of life. This has important implications for the design of interventions aiming to increase quality of life in this population.
The third study, the interview study, indicates that people experience conflict and identity loss that is independent to psychosis. From people's experience, psychosis appears to compound existing disconnection and lack of belonging, rather than create it.
Sectors Healthcare

URL https://academic.oup.com/schizophreniabulletin/advance-article/doi/10.1093/schbul/sbaa124/5912736
 
Description Overseas Institutional Visit
Amount £5,500 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 12/2019
 
Description Patient and Public Involvement
Amount £486 (GBP)
Organisation Queen Mary University of London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2021 
End 04/2021
 
Description Public Engagement Fund
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation Queen Mary University of London 
Department Centre for Public Engagement
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Live Experience Expert working on qualitative analysis 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Using funding obtained successfully from an application to the Centre for Public Engagement, a lived experience researcher was recruited to work on the analysis of interviews about identity changes in psychosis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Live Experience Experts working on analysis 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact We had two meetings, and ongoing discussions over email and phone about the analysis of the systematic review and narrative synthesis. Two people with a lived experience of psychosis were employed to work on the project using funding awarded by the Centre for Public Engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Patient and Carer Advisory Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact The project (the PhD as a whole and the systematic review) was presented to a group of patients and carers (the Service User and carer Group Advising on Research - SUGAR) so that they could advise on the ideas for the future projects and feedback on the ongoing analyses and general progress of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Talk at a conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk at an international conference sparked discussion and questions. People reported interest in the area and collaborations might follow.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020