MRI of Batteries

Lead Research Organisation: University of Birmingham
Department Name: School of Chemistry

Abstract

This project focuses on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the speciation of metal ions in a range of ionic liquid electrolytes and the development of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to visualise battery chemistry in operando. While a range of emerging battery chemistries will be investigated, the project will have a particular focus on Aluminium-ion batteries. This research outcomes from this project will support the design and development of improved electrochemical technologies, providing insight into the speciation, transport and reaction of charge carrying species within a range of emerging battery chemistries. The application of MRI to visualise and quantify these factors, in situ and in real time, remains novel and requires a systematic study of MRI methodology and in situ cell design, as well as an investigation of new ionic liquids electrolytes. A range of techniques will be employed, including NMR spectroscopy, MRI, electrochemical measurements, purification techniques and electrochemical cell design.

Publications

10 25 50

Studentship Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Student Name
EP/N509590/1 01/10/2016 30/09/2021
1947168 Studentship EP/N509590/1 01/10/2017 30/09/2020 Claire Doswell
 
Description This project has focused on the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for investigating novel battery chemistries. The development of new electrode and electrolyte materials is key to commercialising novel battery technologies, and MRI can provide spatially resolved information on the chemistry across the whole battery, non-invasively. Ionic liquids are promising new battery electrolytes as they have low volatility, high conductivity and high electrochemical stability. This project has explored an MRI method of monitoring small changes in an ionic liquid electrolyte that would not be observable without increased signal averaging. Increased signal averaging is not desirable when monitoring a dynamic system as this will increase the time taken for one image, and so the phenomena occurring may not be visible on a slower timescale. By speeding up the acquisition, small changes occurring on faster timescales can be observed and quantified. Additionally, this project has investigated the use of 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and MRI to visualise the evolution of sodium-ion battery chemistry in operando. Using 23Na NMR spectroscopy, the development of multiple species of sodium can be observed during the charge cycle of a full sodium-ion battery. This work also involved the refinement of a new non-magnetic battery assembly design that is both simple to assemble and representative of other batteries made for electrochemical testing.
Exploitation Route The optimisation of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methodology may be used by other magnetic resonance researchers to more accurately indirectly observe a chemical change. The developments and observations of the sodium ion battery behaviour will influence the design of new electrode and electrolyte materials.
Sectors Chemicals,Energy

 
Description MRI of Na Batteries 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Metallurgy and Materials
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The original idea for the experiments was developed by our research team. We executed all magnetic resonance experiments, optimised the operando battery setup, organised the assembly of the batteries, analysed and presented the data.
Collaborator Contribution University of Birmingham, School of Metallurgy and Materials provided battery expertise and electrode and electrolyte materials. University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre provided magnetic resonance spectrometer time, a sodium coil, and sodium magneitc resonance imaging expertise.
Impact This collaboration resulted in a publication which has been submitted to Nature Communications. It is a multidisciplinary collaboration, involving materials science, for the development of electrode materials, electrochemistry, for battery performance assessment, physics and physical chemistry, for the magnetic resonance imaging, and engineering, for optimising the battery cell design.
Start Year 2019
 
Description MRI of Na Batteries 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Department Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The original idea for the experiments was developed by our research team. We executed all magnetic resonance experiments, optimised the operando battery setup, organised the assembly of the batteries, analysed and presented the data.
Collaborator Contribution University of Birmingham, School of Metallurgy and Materials provided battery expertise and electrode and electrolyte materials. University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre provided magnetic resonance spectrometer time, a sodium coil, and sodium magneitc resonance imaging expertise.
Impact This collaboration resulted in a publication which has been submitted to Nature Communications. It is a multidisciplinary collaboration, involving materials science, for the development of electrode materials, electrochemistry, for battery performance assessment, physics and physical chemistry, for the magnetic resonance imaging, and engineering, for optimising the battery cell design.
Start Year 2019