Centre of Excellence for Policy and Evidence in the Creative Industries

Lead Research Organisation: Nesta
Department Name: Policy and Research

Abstract

The UK's creative industries are a national economic strength. Since the turn of the decade, employment, exports and output growth has easily outstripped that in the rest of the economy. Yet, behind this rapid growth lies structural challenges and business uncertainties. And while there has also been rapid growth in academic research on the creative industries, major gaps remain in the evidence base.

The PEC will seek to address these and bring about a step change in the quality and quantity of evidence used to inform decision-making with respect to the creative industries. We propose to organise the PEC's work activities in five overlapping workstrands, each led by an expert UK research centre, and coordinated through a Management Board, chaired by Nesta. We indicate our current thinking on priorities below, however in the first year of the PEC's operation we will consult extensively with industry and policymakers on research questions and beyond that keep the PEC's research agenda relevant and inclusive through ongoing engagement and a mixture of commissioning research activities.

In workstrand 1 Creative Clusters, led by the Science Policy Research Unit at Sussex University, we want to map and visualise the UK's creative clusters by mining official, open and online data sources, and plugging data gaps using a survey instrument based on that used in the AHRC-funded Brighton Fuse and Creative Fuse North East studies. We will investigate local spillovers between creative and other industries, and conduct foresight activities that will engage industry and policymakers on future opportunities and challenges.

In workstrand 2 Skills, Talent and Diversity, led by The Work Foundation, we will track the evolving employment needs of the creative industries. The supply of talent to the creative industries has failed to keep pace with demand - a challenge exacerbated by a lack of diversity. Further, technological, consumer and global trends are driving a shift in production methods and commercial models, creating the need for 'fused' creative, digital and entrepreneurial skills. The PEC will explore how industry, policymakers and educators should respond.

In workstrand3 Intellectual Property, Business Models, Access to Finance and Content Regulation, led by CREATe at Glasgow University, we want to develop digital and open data tools that consolidate the evidence on the effects of IP rights on creative production and consumption, changes in business models, and the emerging data economy. We will undertake research on the challenges for the production, distribution and international exploitation of UK AV content in the context of evolving technologies, globalisation and Brexit. We will also research barriers to finance in the creative industries and how policies should address these.

In workstrand4 Arts, Culture and Public Service Broadcasting, led by the School of Journalism, Media and Culture at Cardiff University, we want to focus on the opportunities and risks for value creation in creative industries arising from public investment in cultural institutions and public service broadcasters. A priority will be to analyse the challenges arising from the use of digital technologies in the arts, entertainment and news (including platform expansion, data analytics and personalisation, and experimentation), and what policymakers, regulators and funders can do to support the creation of value.

In workstrand 5 Creative Industries and International Competitiveness, led by Newcastle University Business School, we will deliver a better understanding of the UK's creative industries in the international economy, including how FDI, immigration and trade influences the spatial distribution of the creative industries. We also propose to improve our understanding of the consequences of Brexit for the creative industries and to inform international trade and investment policies to promote their interests going forward.

Planned Impact

The principal beneficiaries of the PEC will be the UK's creative industries, who will benefit both directly from research and insight that addresses industry challenges and indirectly from policies that are grounded in a more robust evidence base.

The PEC comes at a time when the UK's creative industries face critical questions about their economic future. They will benefit from the PEC in a number of ways. First, through a programme of timely research, data and evidence gathering that addresses their most important questions, and that is communicated in ways that industry can relate to. Second, from evidence-based recommendations in all relevant policy areas that the PEC will energetically communicate to policymakers. Third, through our proposed Research Partnership and Research Co-commissioning engagement models, the PEC will help to build research capacity in industry organisations too, an essential part of the AHRC's ambition to "foster an R&D infrastructure for the creative industries" (p2, Creative Industries Clusters Programme Scope).

We believe that the industry letters of support we have included only scratch the surface: organisations who have indicated their strong interest in partnering with the PEC and co-commissioning research in particular, but who are not yet able to quantify their commitments, include Arts Council England, Creative Scotland and the British Council. The Creative Industries Federation, an important member of our consortium, will play a key role in growing the PEC's industrial partnerships, though the local business networks of all of the universities in our consortium, which span the whole of the UK, will play an equally important role.

The PEC's beneficiaries will also include UK (and other) policymakers, who will benefit from the PEC's evidence-based policy ideas and recommendations, as well as having access to the same research and data sets that will be made available to industry. The PEC will also signpost to creative industry policymakers the excellent resources on policy evaluation that are becoming available to policymakers more generally e.g. Nesta's Alliance for Useful Evidence, the Innovation and Growth Lab and the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth (where co-investigator, Dr Nathan, is Deputy Director), and it will publish additional guidance where there is a need for something specific to the creative industries.

Other beneficiaries will include the wider community of academic researchers. The PEC will be built on a dynamic, multidisciplinary, open and inclusive network, connecting researchers with policymakers, practitioners and other researchers committed to knowledge exchange. Therefore, as well as benefiting from commissioning of external research activities, academics will through the PEC have opportunities to form new research collaborations, access data and develop their research skills is new areas. The PEC will prioritise early career researchers in its skills development activities and will also reach out to the Doctoral Training Partnerships that are based in universities in the consortium.

The AHRC's Creative Clusters R&D Partnerships will also benefit from the PEC's work in areas, like cluster development, intellectual property and R&D, and from the PEC's cross-cutting activities, like market and technology foresight, as well as the open data that the PEC will publish. For its part, the PEC will actively look to make use of, and integrate into its wider programme of activities, the research conducted by the R&D Partnerships.

One of the consortium's distinctive strengths is its nationwide reach: this will ensure that creative businesses and policymakers at local, metropolitan, regional and national levels throughout the UK will benefit. We believe strongly that good policy advice depends critically on having local expertise given the diverse forms of policymaking and governance that exist in the UK's nations and regions.

People

ORCID iD

Hasan Mujtaba Bakhshi (Principal Investigator)
Abigail Gilmore (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0596-6667
Catherine Anne Sleeman (Co-Investigator)
John Arthur Rhys Davies (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7037-6471
Candace Jones (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6472-0723
Heather Jane Carey (Co-Investigator)
Anne Elizabeth Green (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1583-4967
David O'Brien (Co-Investigator)
Pascal Mossay (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5233-3275
Jonathan Sapsed (Co-Investigator)
Giorgio Fazio (Co-Investigator)
Monica Masucci (Co-Investigator)
Josh Siepal (Co-Investigator)
Stuart Allan (Co-Investigator)
Sara Maioli (Co-Investigator)
Neil Lee (Co-Investigator)
Raquel ORTEGA ARGILES (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7783-2230
Juan Mateos-Garcia (Co-Investigator)
Lesley Rebecca Giles (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1704-2787
Rebecca Louise Riley (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2931-1788
Gillian Doyle (Co-Investigator)
Eliza Easton (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4921-9794
Paul Moore (Co-Investigator)
Joel Klinger (Co-Investigator)
Philip Schlesinger (Co-Investigator)
Jenny Kidd (Co-Investigator)
Max A Nathan (Co-Investigator)
Caitriona Noonan (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-7728
Bruce Tether (Co-Investigator)
Martin Kretschmer (Co-Investigator)
Bartolomeo Meletti (Researcher)
Roberto Camerani (Researcher)
Chloe Billing (Researcher)
 
Description The key findings from the PEC's first year of operation are summarised below with links to the full reports and discussion papers provided in the outcomes publications section.

Skills Talent and Diversity
'Createch' Skills:
A common finding future of work studies is that employers will increasingly demand digital skills and creative skills. Some studies go further and suggest that the sweet spot will be where digital skills meet creativity. The PEC examined 35 million job adverts from 2011 - 2018 to identify what 'createch skills' are, what roles require them and how we know if they will become important in the future.
The results show that in January 2018:
• Forty-two per cent of employers in the creative industries said that they had jobs currently affected by skills issues (that is, jobs where either they could not recruit someone with the right skills or where the people doing these jobs did not have the skills needed).
• Skills issues were most common amongst larger establishments, businesses in the Creative ICT & Games and Design & Crafts sub-sectors, businesses in Yorkshire and the Humber, the North West and the North East of England.
• Twenty-two per cent of employers in the creative industries employed at least one non-UK worker, with this being most common amongst larger establishments, Architecture, Design & Crafts and Creative ICT & Games businesses and businesses located in London.
• Ten per cent of employers in the creative industries had employed a freelance worker from the EU in the previous 12 months.
• This report shows that the creative industries have markedly different skills gaps to the economy at large and provides evidence that should be of use to those charged with considering what the immigration system will look like post-Brexit for this vital sector.

Measuring Gender Imbalance in Reporting on the Creative Industries:
The PEC wanted to understand not just the number of women and men in the creative industries, but also how visible they were. We went beyond the numbers to begin to tease out the differences in how women and men in the sector are portrayed, and if and how this has changed in recent years.
Key findings include:
• Amount of space given to women in the newspaper
The last five years has seen a large relative increase in references to women. From 2000-2013, where pronouns were used in an article to identify a person's gender (eg. she, her, he, him), less than a third were referring to women. By 2018, the percentage of pronouns that were female had reached 40 per cent. This means that the amount of space given to women in these articles now exceeds the proportion of women working in the Creative Industries. In 2000, just under a quarter of quotes that were followed by the words 'she' or 'he' (as in 'she said') were by women. Based on current trends, 2019 may be the first year in which women are quoted as often as men in a given month.
• Different words used to describe women and men
Compared to men, there is more focus on particular sounds made by women, such as 'laughs', 'cries', 'giggles', and 'coos', and non-verbal reactions, such as 'smiles', 'grins' and 'nods'. Words that imply creative achievements and leadership roles were more likely to refer to men than women, such as 'directed', 'performed', 'painted' and 'designed' as well as 'managed', 'founded' and 'launched'.
• Comparing different creative sections of the newspaper
In 2018, the Fashion section gave the greatest space to women, and is the only section where the balance has tipped over 50%. On the other hand, in the Technology and Games sections, female pronouns comprised just a quarter of all pronouns in 2018. While these figures are low, they are in fact higher than the proportion of women working in IT, Software and Computer Services, which was estimated at 21 per cent in 2018.
The research is focused on articles within The Guardian because, unlike any other major newspaper in the UK, it offers free open access to its content. This research demonstrates how big data and machine learning can provide new insights on gender inequality.

Creativity and the Future of Skills:
At a time when all jobs, whether in a coffee shop or a bank, can seemingly be described as creative, you'd be forgiven for thinking the word had lost all meaning in the labour market. However, this first piece of PEC research shows that 'creativity' can still tell us important things about those jobs that ask for it.
• Creativity is likely to be even more important in the future job market.
Although it may seem ubiquitous, far from every job advert requests 'creativity' as a requirement. In fact, job adverts for Creative Occupations in the DCMS's official list are still far more likely to ask for it. Strikingly, jobs asking for creativity are also far more likely to grow as a percentage of the workforce by the year 2030. This reinforces the finding from previous research that policymakers should be investing in the workforce's creative skills.
• Employers don't just value creativity alone: they need talent with project management and organisational skills too.
Our analysis suggests that strong project management and organisational skills when combined with creativity will be a particularly potent mix in the future. This should be a key takeaway for anyone involved in training or education policy.
• Creative occupations don't have a monopoly on creativity.
Creativity is not confined to the list of creative occupations compiled by the DCMS. Education and skills policymakers, should look beyond sectoral boundaries when formulating policies to invest in the workforce's creativity. Jobs for which employers request creativity at a similar rate as those in the DCMS list include: Florists, Print finishing and binding workers, Bakers and flour confectioners, Chefs, Hairdressers and barbers. We also find jobs that have a lot in common with Creative Occupations due to the technical skills required. Examples of these jobs include engineers, manufacturing and business development roles. This is something for the Department for Education and other skills leads to consider when developing reskilling policies.

Skills, Talent and Diversity in the Creative Industries: critical issues and evidence gaps:
This research suggests that while the outlook for the Creative Industries is bright; the sector faces a number of pressing challenges relating to talent and diversity that if unaddressed threaten to undermine future success. Some of these challenges relate to the nature of work and working practices in the sector; others to the way in which we value and develop creativity and creative skills. This includes issues that are more immediate or short-term in nature, alongside challenges that are deep-rooted and represent longer-term shift. In total the report identifies nine pressing skills and diversity challenges:
1. Job quality, management & working
practices
While the creative Industries and creative economy are now recognised as a policy priority; and many consider the sector to offer high value activities, highly paid, high-skilled
roles, this is not the full reality. Much of the work is often low-paid and precarious, jeopardising the health and wellbeing of the workforce, and there are significant concerns about how improvements are hampered by management and leadership capability and poor working practices.
2. Skills evolution & skills fusion
Evidence suggests that creative roles will be more resilient to automation and that creativity will become a skill in even greater demand in the future. However, the sector
and the skills needed by those working in the creative industries are and will continue to change dramatically. The future effects of technology and other megatrends need to be fully understood. This is both in terms of growing demand for certain roles, but also changing skill needs within occupations, with an increasing need for design, data, digital and 'fusion' skills.
3. Valuing creative education
While the creative industries are acknowledged as a vital part of the UK's industrial strategy, there are growing concerns about the devaluing and deprioritisation of creative education. This starts in schools and runs right through to higher education, where there is an increasing emphasis on courses that offer strong economic returns, without recognising wider value of creativity and culture.
4. Careers and technical education
Despite widespread reforms to different parts of the UK skills system - including to careers education, apprenticeships and technical education - there are concerns that these are proving challenging to implement in parts of the creative industries. In particular, those working in the sector suggest they aren't sufficiently aligned to industry needs in different parts of the UK, and are failing to create clear "future-proofed" learning pathways to support entry and progression within the sector.
5. Accessing international talent
There are growing concerns around the impact of Brexit on the ability of the creative industries to access international talent. While many creative occupations feature on the updated Shortage Occupation List, some have challenged whether the current £30k minimum salary is too high and will prove too restrictive for the sector.
6. Skill shortages and oversupply
Creative industries, occupations and skills are in growing demand across the economy, but the supply of talent to the sector is failing to keep pace, which risks increasing
deficiencies and mismatches to critical levels. As creative skills are in demand in other sectors of the economy, this is generating fierce competition for talent, accentuating skills shortages in some sub-sectors. In contrast, cuts due to austerity measures are also stimulating over supply in others parts of the sector at the same time.
7. Skill gaps and professional development
There is increasing awareness in a fast paced, modern world that a lack of industry investment in learning and development for those already in work, and support for lifelong
learning, is creating skill deficiencies in the workplace. This is particularly true in areas which have been / will be subject to substantial future change.
8. Maximising the value of diverse talent
The creative industries are failing to make use of the diverse talent that exists in the UK. Consequently, there are growing concerns that the opportunities created in this vibrant
part of the UK economy are 'out of reach' for many and that in some creative sectors and occupations the profile of the workforce looks dramatically different to the UK population.
9. Strengthening local talent pools across the
UK
Relatedly, not all parts of the UK are benefitting from growth opportunities in the creative industries. The industries are deeply segmented and parts of the sector are heavily London and the South East centric. In turn, many of the challenges to growing thriving creative clusters elsewhere in the country are impeded by the development and retention of creative talent.

Immersive Experiences in Museums, Galleries and Heritage Sites:
The PEC looked at recent academic research into immersive experiences in museums, galleries and heritage sites, and highlighted key debates, opportunities and challenges. This work has presented recommendations for arts and heritage organisations who are considering immersive approaches in their work, are interested in how audiences might respond, and want to know more about the challenges, as well as recommendations for funders and policymakers.
Key findings
• Storytelling - Immersive approaches broaden possibilities of digital storytelling - enhancing experiences, challenging conventions and giving users a more active role. New audience propositions are emerging. Narrative techniques can be used to step or pace an experience so that users do not become overwhelmed or bored.
o Recommendation: Avoid technology-centric approaches. Careful consideration should be given to your audience, intended impacts and narrative, before opting for a particular tech solution.
• Social experiences - Social exchanges are important aspects of usability and accessibility, and can be powerfully enhanced during an immersive encounter - whether it's experienced by a group or one person at a time.
o Recommendation: Consider the kind of social interactions an experience will facilitate, directly or indirectly, as sociability is often crucial to enjoyment and creating meaning.
• Emotional engagement - Institutions increasingly want to understand the psychological responses of users to their programming. One of the most pervasive assumptions is that immersive experiences increase empathy, but this needs further exploration.
o Recommendation: Iterative rounds of user testing, including qualitative investigation, can provide insight into possible impacts on users, but these are unlikely to be universal impacts.
• Embodied and spatial interaction - Immersive approaches, even those seemingly experienced 'wholly' digitally, are grounded in a physical and sensorial reality and have the potential to become full body experiences. There is strong evidence that an immersive experience can change the relationship between participants and the physical spaces they occupy.
o Recommendations: Consider how the physical and bodily dimensions of an immersive experience can be made into an asset. The interactions between story, people, place and technology can powerfully enhance an immersive experience, and careful consideration should be given to these flows.
• Authenticity - Debates about authenticity, re-creation and fakery are amplified by digital technologies, and are particularly tricky in heritage contexts. A sense of authenticity is important to those encountering immersive heritage experiences, even where those interventions are playful and performative.
o Recommendation: The possibilities of re-creation come with increased responsibilities that designers and institutions need to take seriously, both for quality and ethical reasons.
• Learning - Many cultural institutions seek to offer users a learning experience through immersive encounters. While some research suggests that this can be the case, the full possibilities of immersive education still need to be explored.
Challenges
• Usability, uptake and onboarding - Technologies often pique the interest of users encouraging engagement, but there are challenges that can undermine an immersive encounter.
o Frame an immersive experience to manage expectations so that users have a sense of what is expected of them eg. Time commitment and movement in physical space.
o Using technology is itself an object interaction within a heritage context. Consider how best to make it frictionless, or even invisible.
• Consider sustainability issues - What will be necessary to keep an experience 'live'? Eg. Staff training, further funding and technical support.
• Evaluation - There is a consensus that mixed methodologies are desirable where possible to adequately account for the nature and quality of experience. Institutions should be live to the challenges of evaluating 'in the wild' and plan for repeat user testing and iteration where practicable.
Opportunities going forward:
• Further efforts to consolidate and articulate a more holistic 'value proposition'.
• Consideration of the ethical implications of immersive practices, particularly in relation to the roles and responsibilities of cultural institutions into the future, and in connection with other current priorities and debates in the sector.
• More research into the impact of immersive technology. Heritage contexts provide a rich testbed for further investigation.

Regional inequalities in the UK's Creative Industries:
Using official Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) Economic Estimates, the PEC has examined the distribution and growth of the Creative Industries in the UK at the regional level. The analysis shows the extent to which London and, to a lesser extent, the South East dominate the creative industries in the UK. Not only are the creative industries larger in London and the South East, they have also been growing faster in these regions than in the rest of the UK.
Furthermore, London and the South East dominate economic output from the creative industries considerably more than they dominate employment in these industries. This implies that labour productivity in the creative industries is substantially higher in London and, to a lesser extent, the South East than in the rest of the UK. Indeed, in some sub-sectors and regions the implied labour productivity of creative industry workers is strikingly low.
The government is committed to 'narrowing the gap' between the London and the South East, both in relation to the creative industries and the economy as a whole. The policy challenge can be summarised as how to maintain growth in London and the South East while ensuring the rest of the country catches up. This implies that the creative industries need to grow faster in the rest of the UK than in London and the South East and, to be meaningful, 'catching up' means not only narrowing the gap in terms of employment, but also in terms of productivity.
This research explores the scale of this policy challenge. It demonstrates that if the rest of the UK is to catch up with London and the South East in terms of employment in the creative industries then employment in these industries in the rest of the UK would have to grow at five times its current rate for the next twenty years. And furthermore for convergence in productivity to occur, labour productivity growth would have to increase very substantially and remain very high for twenty years.
Exploitation Route The outcomes and findings are both informed by and shared with industry, policymaker and academic stakeholders. The focus of the research is informed by the PEC's policy priority log, the PEC's industry champions and through stakeholder consultation events so that these communities are engaged in the outcomes. In addition to an active online communications strategy the PEC's researchers and members of its Advisory Board are engaged in a number of expert panels and advisory committees which allows for signposting of the outcomes and the ongoing research programme.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://www.pec.ac.uk/
 
Description Ahead of the General Election the PEC published a Policy Briefing on How Evidence Should Guide Manifesto Promises on the Creative Industries. All main parties included elements of this in their manifestos.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://pec.ac.uk/policy-briefings/how-evidence-should-guide-manifesto-promises-on-the-creative-indu...
 
Description Cardiff University, provided evidence for a report from the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications and Digital about the importance of public service broadcasting.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201919/ldselect/ldcomuni/16/16.pdf
 
Description A foresight analysis of the Future of Creative Industries 
Organisation British Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PEC co-funded the commission of a foresight analysis on the Future of Creative Industries by Philippe Schneider (independent consultant). This is match funded to the tune of £20k by the British Council as research co-commissioner, and will draw on inputs from the PEC's International Council. It will be completed in mid-2020.
Collaborator Contribution This is match funded (£20k) by the British Council as research co-commissioner.
Impact Foresight Analysis draft due to published mid-2020.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Creative Freelancer Business Models and Place-based Growth 
Organisation Coventry University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Awarded project following the PEC's first open call for research proposals. Funded costs of £30,104. The PEC hosted an inception workshop for all funded projects and the project has an assigned PEC lead to ensure co-ordination of research and impact across the consortium.
Collaborator Contribution The project will address an important evidence gap around the contribution of freelancers to the economic and place-based impacts of the creative industries. It will generate new insights into the business models of creative freelancers and their relationship to local labour markets, creative networks, supply chains and innovation ecosystems - as well as identifying the challenges that they face. Designed to produce 'deep dive' qualitative evidence on creative freelancers, this research will increase understanding of the economic relationships, dynamics and business personas of freelancer models in order to directly support locally-based investment and policy responses to creative industry business models. Led by Coventry University in collaboration with Creative United, Waltham Forest Borough Council, Coventry City of Culture Trust and the Warwick Institute of Employment Research.
Impact No outputs as project has just started.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Creative industries and the Preston Model 
Organisation University of Central Lancashire
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project is funded through the PEC's first open call for research proposals at £47,466. The PEC has hosted an inception meeting for the award holders and the project has been assigned a PEC lead contact to ensure research and impact co-ordination across the consortium.
Collaborator Contribution This project will examine to what extent the Preston Model facilitates the growth and development of the creative industries, within Lancashire. It will focus mainly on the effect of procurement by anchor institutions and the findings will provide an evidence base to local policy makers of potential drivers for successful creative clusters, and the degree to which generic initiatives such as the Preston Model, need to be tailored to enhance support given to specific sectors. Lead investigators: Professor Philip Whyman and Dr Adrian Wright in collaboration with Dr Julian Manley, Dr Richard Weston, Dr Alina Petrescu and Dr Philip Kostov. UCLA is contributing £11.2k fo the projects' staff time.
Impact No outputs as the project has just started.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Evolution of the UK's Creative Clusters, 1991-2018 
Organisation Creative England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This is a research co-commission with Creative England to commission Cambridge Econometrics to undertake a study on the evolution of the UK's creative clusters. The PEC co-funded the project from its research commissioning budget and provided expert advice/reviews on the brief and findings.
Collaborator Contribution Creative England co-funded the study and provided expert advice on the brief and the findings.
Impact Draft report received and due for publication May 2020 to link with Creative England's Creative Nations event.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Film Bang 1976-2020 - resilience and sustainability for freelance careers in the screen industries 
Organisation Edinburgh Napier University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project is funded through the PEC's first open call for research proposals at £35, 266. The PEC has held an inception workshop for award holders and assigned a PEC project lead to ensure research and impact co-ordination across the consortium.
Collaborator Contribution This project seeks to identify ways to support progression, resilience and sustainability for freelance careers in the screen industries. The study draws on over four decades of data contained in the Film Bang directory relating to the numbers and composition of production personnel and technicians working in Scotland. The information in the listings will be coded to capture the changing profile of this community of practice and track continuity of employment. This will provide information about career pathways that can inform future policies to support freelance talent development. Led by Edinburgh Napier University (Lead investigator: Alistair Scott) in collaboration with Marianne Mellin from Film Bang. The university is contributing a proportion of the PIs salary plus estates and indirect costs.
Impact No outputs as the project has just started.
Start Year 2020
 
Description The UK Live Music Industry in a Post-2019 Era; a Globalised Local Perspective 
Organisation Aston University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project is funded at £ 45,638 through the PEC's first open call for research proposals. The PEC hosted an inception workshop for all funded projects and a PEC lead contact has been assigned to the project to ensure coordination of research and impact across the consortium.
Collaborator Contribution This project aims to increase understanding of key socio-political factors with the potential to influence the prosperity and sustainability of the creative industries. The focus for the research will be the live music sector in Birmingham and the study will map the ecologies in order to uncover the interdependencies across different local and global stakeholders. The team will also explore both the potential vulnerabilities to global/political shifts for the sector and the ways in which actors within the value chains anticipate and respond to these challenges by developing mitigation or adaptation strategies. Led by Aston University (Lead investigator: Dr Patrycja Rozbicka) in collaboration with Dr Adam Behr from Newcastle University and Craig Hamilton from Birmingham City University. The core network for the project includes Birmingham City Council, Birmingham Music Coalition, Un-Conventional, the Musicians Union, UK Music, Birmingham Music Archives and BOP Consultancy. Aston University is providing in-kind support of 2 RAs (estimated value below).
Impact No outputs as the project has just started.
Start Year 2019
 
Description The impact of cultural institutions on local creative industries: Culture Mile and five UK benchmarks 
Organisation AEA Consulting
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project is funded through the PEC's first open call for proposals at £49,990. The PEC hosted an inception workshop for award holders and a PEC lead contact has been assigned to the project to ensure research and impact co-ordination across the project.
Collaborator Contribution This project seeks to deepen national understanding of urban clusters in which not-for- profit cultural organisations and creative industries coexist. The study will also examine whether there are ways in which such co-location may act as a framework for mutual growth. Culture Mile in the City of London is the core case study district for an in depth inter organisational networks analysis and the team will also conduct comparative analyses of five other cultural districts across the UK: Better Bankside (London), Salford Quays, Newcastle/Gateshead Quays, Bristol Harbourside and Dundee Waterfront. Led by AEA Consulting (Lead investigator: Natalia Vartapetova) in collaboration with Culture Mile, Geoffrey Crossick and Global Cultural Districts Network.
Impact No outputs as the project has just started.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Working together: co-ops as a creative industry business model 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project is funded through the PEC's first open call for research proposals at £ 27,621.83. The PEC has hosted an inception workshop for all award holders and the project is assigned a PEC lead contact to ensure research and impact co-ordination across the consortium.
Collaborator Contribution This project will examine co-operatives as an alternative business model to solely commercial firms. The study will also look at how effective public policy has been in promoting co-operatives as a way of working in the creative industries and the variations in adoption across sub-sectors. To do this, the focus will be on Scotland, where the devolved government has an explicit policy to promote co-operative ways of working. The research will also consider whether co-operatives offer a vehicle to counter issues of diversity and examine how well the model is understood amongst creative workers. Additionally the study will explore what skills and training people think they may need to set up co-operatives, and how public policy, higher education and business support can respond to that. Led by University of Glasgow (Lead Investigator Professor Kate Oakley) in collaboration with Cultural Workers Organize with contributions from Innovate UK/KTN who are providing the costs of a workshop.
Impact No outputs as the project has just started.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consultation with IPO and stakeholders on Research Expert Advisory Group (REAG): Kretschmer & Easton presented the PEC to this group on, 17 Jan 2019, CIPA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Consultation with Intellectual Property Office and industry stakeholders to inform research plans via the IPO Research Expert Advisory Group leading to further events/roundtables.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description First Industry Champions Panel on the Value of Creative Higher and Further Education 16 July 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact First Industry Champions Panel. The findings are summarised in a blog - linke provided below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://pec.ac.uk/policy-briefings/insights-from-our-industry-champions-the-value-of-creative-higher...
 
Description First Industry Champions networking event 19 September 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact First Industry Champion networking event - 21 champions attended along with a number of representatives from the PEC's Advisory Board, Management Board, consortium and DCMS. Facilitated network of champions and further engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://pec.ac.uk/news/introducing-the-pecs-network-of-industry-champions
 
Description Industry Champions Panel on local creative industries growth in Liverpool at Liverpool World Museum 23 January 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Second panel of 12 Industry Champions met to consider what local policy interventions work for Creative Industries. A blog of the findings is included below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://pec.ac.uk/policy-briefings/how-policymakers-can-support-local-growth
 
Description New empirical research on Intellectual Property litigation and launch of Platform regulation project 26 February 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Workshop on platform regulation that has led to approaches from DCMS and Ofcom re future collaborative work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://pec.ac.uk/blog/shedding-light-on-the-workings-of-the-intellectual-property-enterprise-court-...
 
Description Newcastle consultation event to outline the evidence base around creative industries international competitiveness and gather feedback on research priorities from key stakeholders 23 July 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Consultation event to gather stakeholder views on international competitiveness. Views fed into ongoing and future research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PEC Seminar: Creative industries revisited: contestable narratives, industrial strategy and the research agenda (Goldsmiths) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact PEC collaboration with Goldsmiths, University of London and lecture by Dr Martin Smith followed by guest blog.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://pec.ac.uk/blog/the-creative-industries-revisited-contestable-narratives-the-sector-deal-and-...
 
Description PEC Seminar: From Culture 1.0 to Culture 3.0: Cultural, Economic and Social Value and European Cultural Policy (Nesta) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact PEC research seminar at Nesta's offices on 22/02 by Pier Luigi Sacco, Professor of Cultural Economics at IULM, Milan and Advisor to
Commissioner for Education & Culture at European Commission. Sacco characterised the past, present and future of cultural policy in terms of social,
economic and cultural value. This led to further requests for information about PEC and interest in engaging.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PEC Seminars: Local challenges and policy priorities for the creative industries (Glasgow, Manchester, Cardiff, Queen Mary University of London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Series of 4 workshops bringing academics, policymakers and industry together to examine policy challenges for creative industries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Policy breakfast event around digital technologies in relation to community heritage (Cardiff, 5 July 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The 'Heritage, Community and Opportunity' policy breakfast was held at Cardiff West Community High School - a brand new school located in communities with significant talent and heritage, but which face social and economic challenges - this event was embedded in the school and local community, and led by the pupils as a 'barriers down' conversation.

Incorporating food and lively debate, it was organized by local community development workers and facilitated by a local artist, bringing together pupils, parents and policy makers - including Mark Drakeford, the Welsh First Minister - in an equal and reciprocal co-production partnership that explored how to widen participation and progression to higher education through heritage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://pec.ac.uk/blog/heritage-community-and-opportunity-a-lesson-on-how-to-understand-the-value-of...
 
Description Professor Jen Snowball from Rhodes University discussed the employment opportunities for women and young people in South Africa's creative economy 3 September. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop on gender and diversity in the Creative Economy to build international links and awareness of PEC research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Seminar in Manchester where Max Nathan (UCL) presented his forthcoming paper on the additional economic impacts of the BBC Salford part relocation. 18 February 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The seminar introduced findings from Max Nathan's forthcoming discussion paper on the impact of the BBC's move to Salford.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description The Work Foundation hosted a consultation event on Skills, Talent and Diversity in the creative industries, drawing on its forthcoming evidence synthesis on 17 July 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Stakeholder consultation event based on an evidence synthesis. Stakeholders views shaped future research plans.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Ulster University hosted a stakeholder consultation event with Future Screens Northern Ireland 5 August. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Stakeholder consultation event to inform future research priorities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019