Creating the Energy for Change

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Horizon Digital Economy Research

Abstract

This project will investigate innovative ways of dividing up and representing energy use in shared buildings so as to motivate occupants to save energy. Smart meters (energy monitors that feed information back to suppliers) are currently being introduced in Britain and around the world; the government aims to have one in every home and business in Britain by 2019. One reason for this is to provide people with better information about their energy use to help them to save energy. Providing energy feedback can be problematic in shared buildings, and here we focus on workplaces, where many different people interact and share utilities and equipment within that building. It is often difficult to highlight who is responsible for energy used and difficult therefore to divide up related costs and motivate changes in energy usage. We propose to focus on these challenges and consider the opportunities that exist in engaging whole communities of people in reducing energy use.

This project is multidisciplinary, drawing primarily on computer science skills of joining up data from different sources and in examining user interactions with technology, design skills of developing innovative and fun ways of representing data, and social science skills (sociology and psychology) in ensuring that displays are engaging, can motivate particular actions, and fit appropriately within the building environment and constraints. We will use a variety of methods making use of field deployments, user studies, ethnography, and small-scale surveys so as to evaluate ideas at every step.

We have divided the project into three key work packages: 'Taking Ownership' which will focus on responsibility for energy usage, 'Putting it Together' where we will put energy usage in context, and 'People Power' where we will focus on creating collective behaviour change. In more detail, 'Taking Ownership' will explore how to identify who is using energy within a building, how best to assign responsibility and how to feed that back to the occupants. We know that simplicity of design is key here, as well as issues of fairness and ethics, and indeed privacy (might people be able to monitor your coffee drinking habits from this data?). 'Putting it Together' will consider different ways of combining energy data, e.g. joining this up across user groups or spaces, and combining energy data with other commonly available information, e.g. weather or diary data, so as to put it in context. We will also spend time considering the particular building context, the routines that currently exist for occupants, and the motivations that people have for using and saving energy within the building, in understanding how best to present energy information to the occupants.

Our third theme, 'People Power' will focus on changing building user's behaviour collectively. We will examine how people interact around different energy goals, considering in particular cooperation and regulation, in finding out what works best in different contexts. The project then brings all aspects of research together in the use of themed challenge days where we promote specific energy actions for everyone in a building (e.g. switching off equipment after use) and demonstrate the impact that collective behaviour change can have. Beyond simply observing what works in this context through objective measures of energy usage, we will analyse when and where behaviour changes occurred and speak to the users themselves to find out what was engaging.

These activities will combine to inform technical, design and policy recommendations for energy monitoring in workplaces as well as conclusions for other multi-occupancy buildings. Moreover, we will develop a tool kit to pass on to other companies and buildings so that others can use the findings and experience gained here. We will also explore theoretical implications of our results and communicate our academic findings to the range of disciplines involved

Planned Impact

The aim of the project is to identify means of changing behaviour so as to reduce energy use in shared spaces. Energy demand reduction is a cost effective means of achieving significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As such, potential beneficiaries are wide-ranging. Project outcomes have direct and immediate relevance for policy makers; energy and climate related NGOs; any organisations large enough to run multiple-occupancy offices - be they public, business or third sector; organisations concerned with managing energy in buildings; and academic researchers in areas involving energy, climate change, and/or the built environment. There are also implications for the wider public. As issues addressed (energy demand and emissions reduction) are of international relevance, longer term beneficiaries are not UK-limited. There is the potential for follow-on work which utilises Horizon's international partners, such as China Mobile, to achieve wider dissemination.

Given the potential to reduce energy use, lower energy bills, and potentially impact on building regulations, government departments including DECC, Ofgem, and BIS will find value in the project's outcomes which, in the short term, will illustrate methods of achieving current relevant policy aims (potentially informing advice and information disseminated in this area) and in the longer term may contribute to evidence-based policy-making. It addresses several UK government policy priorities, including economic competitiveness, climate change, energy security, and sustainable development. As noted above, these interests are shared by all developed economies, and are increasingly influential on policy in developing nations. The Committee on Climate Change's (CCC) Fourth Carbon Budget (2010), which sets out UK objectives for GHG emission reductions, targets a reduction in buildings-related emissions of 56% by 2030. Whilst considerable research has been conducted into encouraging low-carbon behaviours in the home (for example smart meters research, little attention has been paid to the more complex, but no less important, challenge of achieving the same in work-place settings.

For large-scale employers, whether national and local government, businesses, or third sector organisations, the project will contribute to decarbonising their operations and the lowering of their energy costs. For the commercial sector, research outputs will also contribute to the nascent energy management services market. Here, there is likely to be particular interest in design principles and prototypes developed, and engagement solutions for different contexts and building designs which may be incorporated into current projects. Longer term impacts may include the development of new service solutions, or even new start-up companies, based on project ideas and findings.

With regards to academic impact, the project will investigate an overlooked element in a rapidly growing research area addressing low carbon transitions. As such, it will speak to a multidisciplinary field incorporating social and computational sciences, design, and the built environment, not only generating new understandings but also strengthening inter-disciplinary linkages in areas which have so far been developed largely in isolation to one another.

For the general public, we aim to raise the visibility of energy use for employees working in shared spaces. This has the immediate aim of reducing energy use and wastage in the workplace, but may also result in further sustainable behaviour changes if those engaged transfer ideas and new energy practices to other areas of their lives. We also note the overarching value to society of achieving energy and so GHG reductions through behavioural means, both in economic and environmental terms.
 
Description We identify four key achievements from the Ctech project: the observation of success factors in energy interventions in the workplace and identification of future research possibilities in relation to digital technologies; identification of key motivations to save energy in the workplace and how these change with social interactions; the analysis of the role of the facilities manager in achieving workplace energy reductions; and energy savings as a result of digital technology deployments.

Our research has reviewed and integrated empirical and theoretical data from a range of academic and grey literature in identifying methods of apportioning energy data to users in the workplace, and in summarising the evidence that is known about energy interventions in the workplace. We highlight enablement (providing autonomy and support to employees), and modelling (various forms of social influence) as key features of previously successful interventions to save energy in workplace buildings. Given technical and social considerations we conclude that apportioning energy to spatially organized groups (as opposed to existing communities or individuals) is likely to be the preferable situation for most workplaces. Workplace energy policies must be coherent and integrated with wider organizational policies to be successful and we particularly recommend setting clear specific goals around energy use with accompanying feedback on those goals.

Users must be motivated in order to change their energy use behaviour and we have undertaken a series of explorations of motivations to save energy in the workplace, quite a different context from the home where the majority of research in this field has been conducted. Our data indicates that people are mostly motivated to save energy because of environmental reasons, in order to help their company's spending and image, and in order to gain warm-glow feelings. Interestingly, self-image motivations negatively predicted energy saving behaviours indicating that people may think that energy saving does not fit with a positive work image. We also find that people's energy use intentions depend on the behaviour of others. For example, we find that cooperative behaviour is observed where people are willing to decrease their own energy use so that others can use more, where they have a legitimate need to do so. Converging psychological data, ethnographic research, and user workshops we find that actually the potential for individual behavior change is often limited and a greater scope for achieving energy savings is likely to be achieved by looking beyond individual behavior to collaborative behaviours and organizational policy changes.

The role of the Facilities Manager (FM) has a particularly pivotal role in the potential for achieving energy savings in a workplace but requires the support to do so. In particular we observe that the potential of the FM is often constrained by demands to meet workforce expectations of comfort; a lack of support from senior management; and a shortage of resources. We highlight the complexity of negotiations in energy use and management and the need to support communications between building users on this topic.

Our interdisciplinary team of researchers has integrated expertise and insights in order to provide a multifaceted perspective on saving energy in the workplace. The original overarching aim of the project was to change behaviours in shared workplace buildings by engaging building users with interactive public energy feedback. We have met this objective through small-scale deployments in several different workplace settings. Deployments have successfully resulting in behaviour change at the building user level, organisational policy changes, and increased engagement of building users with organisational policies; importantly reductions in energy used have also been observed. We also developed a broader energy digital engagement tool (e- Genie: Goal Setting and Energy Information Engagement tool). e-Genie is an innovative tool in that it provides energy
data visualizations to building users rather than FMs; it also differs from previous tools in that it provides support for users to make plans to meet energy-saving goals, it supports discussion between building users, and it provides support for social as well as individual behaviour change. Initial trials of e-Genie have indicated moderate success with subsequent higher levels of energy-saving concerns and social energy behaviour reported, converging with significant decreases in electricity usage data. e-Genie has been taken on by the Centre for Sustainably Energy as a tool to help workplaces save energy and associated computer code is available open source for other practitioners and researchers to make use of.
Exploitation Route Our findings may be utilised by energy managers within industry, policy makers, and academics from a range of disciplines. Energy managers within industry should be able to make use of our insights in engaging staff within energy saving initiatives, and designing energy saving interventions in order to maximise savings made and likely success in terms of workforce engagement. Our insights into social interactions around energy use in energy sharing situations also provides information about the importance of context and how new technologies and systems can best be introduced in order to avoid unintended consequences (such as increases in energy use). In addition, our conclusions provide insight into organisational energy efficiencies, the utility of increasing communications about energy policy, and particularly the significance of the facilities management role and the benefits of empowering people within this position.

There are several aspects of our findings that may be of interest to policy makers and our conclusions point to ways in which new legislations may encourage organisations to have an increased focus on energy efficiencies. In particular policies that encourage the consideration of environmental framings of energy saving (including requirements for carbon information) appear useful, those that increase the importance placed upon energy reporting, and those that increase the significance of the facilities management position would be welcomed.

Multiple academic audiences have and continue to benefit from the work carried out as part of this project. In addition to theoretical insights contributed by the Psychological, Sociological and HCI researchers within this project to the respective disciplines, empirical work and work that integrates the different disciplinary perspectives and existing literature adds to the applied field of energy research.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Energy,Environment

URL http://energyforchange.ac.uk
 
Description Project activities have achieved impact within academia, industry, policy, and wider public domains. We have undertaken a range of interventions (including workshops, and different energy visualisations) in several different types of workplace including council offices and libraries and a hospital. These have variously resulted in increased understandings of energy usage, facilitating and encouraging procedural changes to energy use, and in concrete energy savings. Our smaller scale interventions, along with empirical work and insights from each of the disciplines involved in this project was the foundation for a broader digital engagement tool for encouraging and supporting energy savings in the workplace, known as e-GENIE (Goal Setting and Energy Information Engagement) tool. e-Genie was deployed twice in tests of the usability and utility of the tool in an industry setting and a council setting (different to earlier smaller scale interventions). e-Genie is an innovative tool in that it provides energy data visualizations to building users rather than FMs, only done by a few other recent tools. It differs from these previous tools in that it provides support for users to make plans to meet energy-saving goals, it supports discussion between building users, and it provides support for social as well as individual behaviour change. In our second larger trial of e-Genie, evaluations indicated subsequent higher levels of energy-saving concerns and social energy behaviour; these data converged with objective data indicating a 25% decrease in electricity usage after a fortnight of deployment and a 37% decrease after six weeks. Importantly, decreases in electricity were observed over and above reductions in heating due to increases in temperature over the study period. The long-term impacts of the tool are unknown, however, as further evaluation was not possible due to technical issues. Data from workshops and open-ended survey questions also indicated that additional energy data, and associated visualizations, were liked and welcomed in the workplace setting by both building users and facilities management. It is proposed that e-Genie is best developed as a modular tool, adapting to the organizational context as necessary. A toolkit has now been developed, which aims to translate our findings into reusable processes for further organisations. This consists of details of workshop protocols, procedural details for using visualisation tools such as e-Genie, a research digest of Ctech findings for a lay audience, and a practitioners summary of the existing literature on energy interventions in the workplace. We have made the systems code for e-Genie open source so that this is able to be re-used by other practitioners and researchers and CSE have taken on e-Genie as a tool that they will continue to use when working with workplaces in promoting energy saving. Recently CSE have installed e-Genie within their own offices in order to further understand, test, and showcase the software. We are currently looking for further funding in order to develop e-Genie further to make it simpler to use. We also think it is a useful research tool with which to further examine energy behaviour in the workplace. We suggest that future research could consider developing use cases where energy issues do not currently exist (e.g. energy challenges). Digital energy visualizations for ordinary building users in the workplace may also be useful for supporting more advanced efficiency goals, e.g. shifting energy usage, away from peak times. This could facilitate organizational responses to avoiding network charges for peak time use and reduce overall energy system demand requirements.
Sector Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Energy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Economic

 
Description Academic member of Customer Panel at Western Power Distribution
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Advisory panel member (Spence) on 'Public responses to innovative mapterials use and consumption' research grant (PI - Nick Pidgeon, Cardiff University)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Advisory panel member on STESS (A Socio-Technical and Multilevel Perspectives on Energy Services Security). EU funded 4-year study based in Israel (PI- Yael Parag)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description International advisor to EPFL smart living lab
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Feasibility Study
Amount £36,320 (GBP)
Funding ID 132060 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2015 
End 03/2016
 
Description Horizon agile funds
Amount £28,196 (GBP)
Organisation HORIZON Digital Economy Research 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2016 
End 01/2017
 
Description International Collaboration Fund
Amount £1,421 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 05/2017
 
Description International Collaboration Fund
Amount £1,421 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 05/2017
 
Description Joint funded by the EPSRC IAA (impact accelerator account) at the University of Nottingham and Horizon Digital Economy Research
Amount £50,722 (GBP)
Organisation HORIZON Digital Economy Research 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2016 
End 06/2017
 
Description Platform Grants
Amount £1,431,420 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P010164/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2017 
End 04/2022
 
Description Research Priority Area Development Funding
Amount £300,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2016 
End 07/2019
 
Description Standard Research
Amount £493,582 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L024608/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 03/2017
 
Description Standard Research
Amount £277,067 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L02392X/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 03/2016
 
Description User Interaction with ICT
Amount £806,241 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N014243/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2019
 
Title UK Survey data of Perceptions of electricity use at home and in the workplace 
Description UK Survey data has been archived in the UK data archive open access. Data relates to Perceptions of electricity use at home and in the workplace. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None known yet. 
URL https://reshare.ukdataservice.ac.uk/cgi/users/home?screen=EPrint::View&eprintid=853114
 
Description Boots for Ctech interventions 
Organisation Boots UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Insight into motivations of staff to engage with energy savings.
Collaborator Contribution Access to staff and insight into energy policy
Impact Primarily a Psychology endeavour. Related academic publication under review. Benefits to Boots: 1. Insights in our employees' motivations to save energy at work, particularly the insight that focusing on benefits to the company can be efficient and direct benefits to the employee detrimental. 2. Information on which energy saving behaviours to prioritise among our staff. 3. Understanding differences in positive motivations and behaviours in our different sectors: main offices and stores. 4. The results will be used in the design of sustainability campaigns and interventions requiring staff engagement.
Start Year 2014
 
Description CTECH Trial Interventions 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Research into workplace energy use and environmental comfort
Collaborator Contribution Access and use of facilities and equipment; staff time for interviews, workshops, planning, communications
Impact Energy reduction programmes at Wiltshire and NCC. All papers attributed to CTECH project.
Start Year 2013
 
Description CTECH Trial Interventions 
Organisation Experian
Country Ireland 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Research into workplace energy use and environmental comfort
Collaborator Contribution Access and use of facilities and equipment; staff time for interviews, workshops, planning, communications
Impact Energy reduction programmes at Wiltshire and NCC. All papers attributed to CTECH project.
Start Year 2013
 
Description CTECH Trial Interventions 
Organisation Nottingham City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Research into workplace energy use and environmental comfort
Collaborator Contribution Access and use of facilities and equipment; staff time for interviews, workshops, planning, communications
Impact Energy reduction programmes at Wiltshire and NCC. All papers attributed to CTECH project.
Start Year 2013
 
Description CTECH Trial Interventions 
Organisation Wiltshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Research into workplace energy use and environmental comfort
Collaborator Contribution Access and use of facilities and equipment; staff time for interviews, workshops, planning, communications
Impact Energy reduction programmes at Wiltshire and NCC. All papers attributed to CTECH project.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Digital Catapult collaboration for Ctech Trials 
Organisation Digital Catapult
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provision of analysis of energy data and visualisations of energy data. Also data sensors and equipment for measuring and presenting energy data to occupants.
Collaborator Contribution Engagement with energy discussions and tools provided. Feedback on ideas and visualisations.
Impact Multidisciplinary involving Sociology, Psychology, Human Computer Interaction and Computer Science. Academic papers currently being developed. Benefits to The Digital Catapult: - more conscious of energy saving and the image that is projected by a company - provision of concrete energy data which can be referred to when making operational decisions. Gives credibility to points being made. - thermal imaging cameras were taken home and resulted in installing of energy saving measures in residences (impacts beyond the workplace trial).
Start Year 2015
 
Description Nottingham City Council 
Organisation Nottingham City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have discussed C-tech research outputs and ideas and particularly the e-Genie tool that was developed within the project and the potential use within the councils buildings for intervening to save energy.
Collaborator Contribution Our contacts have been discussing their energy use and identifying buildings that may benefit from energy reduction interventions.
Impact Collaboration is multi-disciplinary. Within C-tech, we are drawing on Psychology, Sociology, and Human - Computer Interaction, within the City council, we are drawing on energy management experience with Engineering and Data analytic expertise.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Partnership with University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust for deployments 
Organisation University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust
Department Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution We utilised Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre as a small scale test site for the temperature calendar visualisation tool for three weeks on 6 floors of the building. We provided 3 temperature sensors and 1 tablet display, which visualised temperatures for each floor. of the building. In order to evaluate impact, we interviewed 6 staff members. We also conducted two workshops involving Ctech project team members and hospital staff members (N = 6 per workshop), both examining energy issues, policy, and potential means of reducing energy use within the hopsital.
Collaborator Contribution Discussions of energy issues within a hospital environment. Access to hospital buildings and staff. Contributions of staff time to interviews and workshops.
Impact Contributed to development of e-Genie software code. Multi-disciplinary efforts primarily involving Human Computer Interaction and Sociology.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wiltshire County Council involvement with Ctech trials 
Organisation Wiltshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We provided expertise and support in interpretations of energy data.
Collaborator Contribution Partners provided energy data, time from various staff members, and input into contextualising energy data.
Impact The collaboration was multidisciplinary involving Sociology, Human-Computer Interaction, and Computer Science. Goulden, M. and Spence, A. (2015). Caught in the Middle: The Role of the Facilities Manager in Organisational Energy Use. Energy Policy. 85, 280-287. Bedwell, B., Leygue, C., Goulden, M., McAuley, D., Colley, J., Ferguson, E., Banks, N. and Spence, A., (2014). Apportioning energy consumption in the workplace: a review of issues in using metering data to motivate staff to save energy. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management. Special Issue of Smart Metering Technology & Society. 1196-1211. Costanza, E., B. Bedwell, M. Jewell, J. Colley, and T. Rodden (2016). 'A bit like British Weather, I Suppose' Design and Evaluation of the Temperature Calendar. In Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI '16, New York, NY, USA. ACM. Bedwell, B., E. Costanza, and M. Jewell (2016). Understanding energy consumption at work: Learning from arrow hill. In Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing, CSCW '16, New York, NY, USA. ACM. doi:10.1145/2818048.2819993 Impacts on Wiltshire Council: - major savings from identifying water heating wastage - considerations for future policy changes around energy systems and building management
Start Year 2014
 
Title Temperature Calendar 
Description The Temperature Calendar is a web-based visualization of temperature variation within a building over the course of the past week. It is designed mainly for the workplace, and it highlights deviation from organizational temperature policy, with the aim to bring staff "into the loop" of understanding and managing heating, and so reduce energy waste. The Temperature Calendar was conceived as a public display, to be installed in a shared area of a non-domestic building (e.g. an office kitchenette). 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Temperature Calendar was deployed for three weeks in five public libraries in the South of England. Analysis of interaction logs, questionnaires and interviews shows that staff used the system to understand heating in their buildings, and took action reflecting this new understanding, to save energy or to improve working conditions. 
URL https://bitbucket.org/ecostanza/sdsample/overview
 
Title e-Genie (Goal-setting and ENergy Information Engagement tool) 
Description The e-Genie tool has two main sections: front screens which provide energy information feedback (both electricity and gas) and which scroll periodically, and further screens that users reach by 'Taking Action' to support discussing and changing behaviour and reporting energy related faults. Thermal imagining cameras and digital thermometers were also made available for building users alongside e-Genie in order to provide further tools for gaining more fine grained information about the building's energy use. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact We have trialled e-Genie in two organisations to date, one is ongoing and the evaluation of this trial is not yet complete. From the first trial the overall impact of having e-Genie in the office was minimal. The first deployment served primarily as a test of the technology and at the site, the majority of the staff had little or no control over the environment or power aspects of the building. However for those individuals that were involved in the Ctech project in some way, it was reported that it made them more conscious of energy saving and the image that is projected by a company with regards to whether they are energy conscious or not. The organisation did report that they saw clear benefits from having e-Genie installed in our office in that it provided them with concrete energy data which they could refer to when making operational decisions. It was reported as giving credibility to points being made and allowed the illustration of, for example, exactly where the hottest bit of the building is. The thermal imaging cameras deployed alongside e-Genie were also interesting to the building users and were taken home by building users. It was reported that people enjoyed using these and there were energy efficiency measures installed (e.g. sealing strips, draught excluders, loft insulation and caps added to chimney stacks) as a direct result of their use. 
URL https://bitbucket.org/mjewell/ctech/src/efedf3402d6fd446d0e1a7617943ae10c568762b/ctech/?at=ctech-upd...
 
Description Altruism vs benevolence: The case of saving energy at work 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation poster presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Poster presented at the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Several attendees who viewed the poster followed up with contact afterwards asking for further information, increasing our dissemination and networks.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://eventegg.com/spsp-2014/
 
Description Behave12 conference (Helsinki) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presented at Behave12 conference on Energy Efficiency and Behaviour - discussions afterwards prompted me to engage with EON and become involved in their Thinking Energy consumer engagement project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.behave2012.info/about/
 
Description Behave14 conference (Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presented at Behave14 conference on Energy; my talk prompted discussions with Energy Saving Trust and UKERC, and joint proposal with Energy Saving Trust aimed at EPSRC funding
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://behaveconference.com
 
Description Conference presentation in Mexico 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Conference presentation in Mexico reporting on collaborative work between Caroline Leygue, Patricia Ortega-Andeane and Alexa Spence.

Leygue, C., Ortega-Andeane, P., & Spence, A. (2018). Razones para Ahorrar Electricidad en el Hogar y el Trabajo en México y Reino Unido, 5 Congreso Interncional de Sustentabilidad, October 24-26, Toluca, Mexico.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Consumer workshops on demand-side management 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact DESIMAX considers a future where consumers are required to be more flexible in their use of electricity to allow the National Grid to coordinate the country's electricity use more efficiently. To this end I was involved in facilitating focus groups in different districts near to Nottingham to explore the public's perceptions of near-future smart energy technologies; to elicit views on these technologies we developed three short videos that explain positive and negative impacts on three households. These videos can be found in different languages on YouTube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://horizonenergy.blogspot.co.uk
 
Description Coverage of energy sharing and energy feedback paper in NZ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Coverage of research article on interactions around energy use in the New Zealand Herald. Article title as 'Guilt trips have a positive effect on our behavior and lead to better cooperation',.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11855829
 
Description EON Thinking Energy project focus groups 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Presented to domestic participants in EON's Thinking Energy project, illustrating how their energy data might be used by future smart appliances; EON reported strong interest by participants in continuing to participate in the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description EPSRC blog 'The Energy for Change' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A blog post for the EPSRC website focusing on the impact of the Ctech project. Discussions with other academics followed publication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.epsrc.ac.uk/newsevents/events/connectednation/blog/energyforchange/
 
Description Energy sharing and energy feedback paper coverage from Daily Mail 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of energy engagement and feedback paper by the Daily Mail. Headline was 'Guilt trips are GOOD for you: Researchers find they lead to better cooperation'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4497032/Researchers-guilt-trips-lead-better-cooperati...
 
Description Energy sharing and energy feedback paper coverage from www.phys.org 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of energy sharing and energy feedback paper by ww.phys.org. Headline was 'A 'guilt trip' is the road to cooperation'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://phys.org/news/2017-05-guilt-road-cooperation.html
 
Description France24 video report on smart living 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Video spot on France24 news channel, explaining current research by Horizon around domestic environmental psychology
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
URL http://growlingfish.com/portfolio/smart-living/
 
Description IBM Software Client Architect Exchange talk (Cambridge) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In April 2012 I was invited to give a talk explaining the links between Psychology research and design at IBM's Software Client Architect Exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Ingenuity workshop: Sustainability in the Workplace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 12 attendees from local businesses attended a workshop run by Caroline Leygue and Ben Bedwell to hear about our latest research and to generate ideas about how this relates to their work. This disseminated research from the project and also helped us to develop further ideas for follow on research.

Follow ups from several people (3) enquiring further about research activities, opportunities and ideas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/ingenuitybusiness/2014/06/30/sustainability-in-the-workplace/
 
Description Invited keynote to the Facilities Manager Forum event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited keynote at FM Forum event, prompted discussion on new approaches to reducing energy use in workplaces, and let to network building.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker at The Carbon Journey Event at Genting Arena 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This is an annual event primarily for students at Aston and Birmingham City University, as well as relevant industry partners to discuss how climate change will impact society, business and the professions. We had 1400-1500 attendees.
The feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive. 80% of attendees said that the event had helped raised their awareness of climate change, 49% of attendees said that the event had provided them with knowledge and awareness that will improve their employability, 38% said that the event provided them with knowledge and skills to assist their studies. 67% also said that they thought the event should be open to a wider audience.
The event was Highly Commended for the Green Gowns award.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.aston.ac.uk/thecarbonjourney/
 
Description Invited talk at UNAM, Mexico City by Caroline Leygue 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Caroline Leygue gave an invited talk at the Summit of Behavioural Economics in UNAM, Mexico City. Talk was titled, 'Promoting energy saving at home and at work,'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited talk at York University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Alexa Spence gave an invited lecture on public perceptions of climate change and energy at York University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description MayFest (University of Nottingham outreach day) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 3500 members of the public visited the University of Nottingham's open day. We ran a practical demo of energy monitoring, helping children and parents match energy traces to appliances.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Media coverage for DSM paper in New Scientist 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of DSM paper by New Scientist. Headline was, 'UK people happy to cut energy use, but wary of smart meters'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27419-uk-people-happy-to-cut-energy-use-but-wary-of-smart-met...
 
Description Media coverage for DSM paper in the Guardian 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of DSM paper in the Guardian, headline was 'Hand over control of my fridge to an energy company? No thanks, say Brits'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/apr/27/hand-over-control-of-my-fridge-to-an-energy-comp...
 
Description Media coverage for DSM paper in the Telegraph 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of the DSM paper. Headline was 'Smart meters: will you pay more for 'peak electricity'?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/energy-bills/11617413/Smart-meters-will-you-pay-...
 
Description Media coverage for e-Genie paper in www.phys.org 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of the e-Genie paper in www.phys.org Headline was 'e-Genie tool could grant energy saving wishes for businesse'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://phys.org/news/2018-01-e-genie-tool-grant-energy-businesses.html
 
Description Media coverage for e-Genie paper in www.power-technology.com 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Media coverage for e-Genie paper in www.power-technology.com Headline was 'e-Genie monitoring software helps businesses to reduce energy use'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.power-technology.com/news/e-genie-monitoring-software-helps-businesses-reduce-energy-use...
 
Description Media coverage for energy sharing and feedback paper in the Mail on Sunday 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage for the energy sharing and feedback paper, headline was ' Guilt trips are GOOD for you: Researchers find they lead to better cooperation'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4497032/Researchers-guilt-trips-lead-better-cooper...
 
Description Media coverage for energy sharing and feedback paper in the New Yorker 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of energy sharing and feedback paper. Headline was 'The smart, angry home'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/smart-angry-home
 
Description Media coverage for energy sharing and feedback paper on nla-eclipsweb.com 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage for energy sharing and energy feedback paper on www.nla-eclipsweb.com
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description ORCHID PhD training workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I ran a training workshop on energy monitoring for PhD students associated with the ORCHID project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Panel at Centrica 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Expert panel about AI and HCI in the context of energy at an internal event at Centrica in Windsor
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public talk and launch of alpha version of e-Genie software at the Digital Catapult, London. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact 20-30 people attended an open talk in the exhibition space at the Digital Catapult in London for the launch of our first trial of the e-Genie software. Attendees were people who worked at the Digital Catapult who are primarily entrepreneurs working on future digital economy products and services. This resulted questions and discussion afterwards and some follow up discussions about e-Genie and the information it provides and also the possibility of collaborations on future projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.digitalcatapultcentre.org.uk/e-genie-saving-energy-in-the-workplace/
 
Description Radio interview on BBC Radio Nottingham about Ctech related recent research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Caroline Leygue and Ben Bedwell were separately interviewed (on the same show) about our work on energy monitoring and how people interact around energy displays in a shared context.

Members of the public phoned in to talk about their experiences with saving and wasting energy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.growlingfish.com/share/bbcradionottingham-pt1.mp3
 
Description Radio interview on C-tech 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In October 2014 I spoke alongside Dr Caroline Leygue on BBC Radio Nottingham about energy monitoring in shared buildings (C-tech project).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://growlingfish.com/portfolio/c-tech/
 
Description Radio interview on C-tech 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on BBC Local Radio alongside Dr Caroline Leygue on BBC Radio Nottingham about energy monitoring in shared buildings (C-tech project).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://growlingfish.com/portfolio/c-tech/
 
Description Radio interview on Power Play 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In March 2013 I gave an interview to Radio Nottingham to mark the start of the Power Play project. In this project we are working with households from 75 smart-meter and appliance-monitored homes to explore, through experimental methods from social psychology and behavioral economics, the impact of community on household energy decisions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://growlingfish.com/portfolio/powerplay/
 
Description Radio interviews on BBC Radio Local - The Mark Forrest Show 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Caroline Leygue and Ben Bedwell were interviewed (separately) on the Mark Forrest radio show about energy monitoring and the way that people interact with each other around energy displays.

Members of the public called in with their views on energy saving and wastage and David Weatherall from the Energy Saving Trust commented on the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.growlingfish.com/share/bbcradiolocal-pt1.mp3
 
Description Science & Family Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Around 350 children and their families attended the Science & Family Day 2015 (part of British Science Week) at the university of Southampton.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description TEDDINET-Ctech Non-Domestic Energy Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This symposium brought together representatives from academia, industry and policy to share and discuss cutting-edge research insights around non-domestic energy consumption and sustainability. The symposium featured a keynote from Professor Linda Steg (University of Groningen) and an expert discussion panel, including Simon Roberts (Centre for Sustainable Energy), Joseph Williams (UK Green Building Council), Judith Ward (Sustainability First). Talks featured findings from the pioneering Creating the Energy for Change (Ctech) project, and presentations received from the wider research community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.horizon.ac.uk/teddinet-ctech-non-domestic-energy-symposium-26th-june/
 
Description Teddinet - Ctech symposium/ findings launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Ctech project collaborated with the TEDDI network in hosting a symposium on non-domestic energy research at the Digital Catapult in London. This featured the findings launch of the Ctech project. Audience members included practitioners, policy makers and members from the third sector as well as academics. There were many questions and debate and following the event, the Ctech project were invited to submit a paper to a special issue in Buildings, Research and Information (now published), invited to collaborate on other projects, and has sparked continuing discussions abour research both with academics, practiioners and a third sector group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description The Science Show - University Radio Nottingham 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Alexa Spence participated in The Science Show hosted by Carl Mundy for an hour long show examining public perceptions of climate change and energy saving. Within this, she discussed some of the current research being undertaking by this project.

Students called into the show with questions and tweeted about the show.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://urn1350.net/podcast/110