Developing a drought narrative resource as a multi-stakeholder decision making utility in drought risk management

Lead Research Organisation: NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
Department Name: Water Resources (Wallingford)

Abstract

This innovative interdisciplinary project aims to develop an easy-to-use, evidence-based resource which can be used in decision-making in drought risk management. To achieve this, we will bring together information from drought science and scenario-modelling (using mathematical models to forecast the impacts of drought) with stakeholder engagement and narrative storytelling. While previous drought impact studies have often focused on using mathematical modelling, this project is very different. The project will integrate arts, humanities and social science research methods, with hydrological, meteorological, agricultural and ecological science knowledge through multi-partner collaboration. Seven case study catchments (areas linked by a common water resource) in England, Wales and Scotland will be selected to reflect the hydrological, socio-economic and cultural contrasts in the UK. Study of drought impacts will take place at different scales - from small plot experiments to local catchment scale. Citizen science and stakeholder engagement with plot experiments in urban and rural areas will be used as stimuli for conversations about drought risk and its mitigation.
The project will: (i) investigate different stakeholder perceptions of when drought occurs and action is needed; (ii) examine how water level and temperature affect drought perception; (iii) explore the impact of policy decisions on drought management; (iv) consider water users' behaviours which lead to adverse drought impacts on people and ecosystems and; (v) evaluate water-use conflicts, synergies and trade-offs, drawing on previous drought experiences and community knowledge.

The project spans a range of sectors including water supply; health, business, agriculture/horticulture, built environment, extractive industries and ecosystem services, within 7 case-study catchments. Through a storytelling approach, scientists will exchange cutting edge science with different drought stakeholders, and these stakeholders will, in turn, exchange their knowledge. Stakeholders include those in: construction; gardeners and allotment holders; small and large businesses; local authorities; emergency planners; recreational water users; biodiversity managers; public health professionals - both physical and mental health; and local communities/public.
The stakeholder meetings will capture various data including:
- different stakeholder perceptions of drought and its causes
- local knowledge around drought onset and strategies for mitigation (e.g. attitudes to water saving, responses to reduced water availability)
- insights into how to live with drought and increase individual/community drought resilience
- the impact of alternating floods and droughts

The information will be shared within, and between, stakeholder groups in the case-studies and beyond using social media. This information will be analysed, and integrated with drought science to develop an innovative web-based decision-making utility. These data will feedback into the drought modelling and future scenario building with a view to exploring a variety of policy options. This will help ascertain present and future water resources availability, focusing on past, present and future drought periods across N-S and W-E climatic gradients. The project will be as far as possible be 'open science' - maintaining open, real-time access to research questions, data, results, methodologies, narratives, publications and other outputs via the project website, updated as the project progresses.
Project outputs will include: the decision-making support utility incorporating science-narrative resources; hydrological models for the 7 case-study catchments; a social media web-platform to share project resources; a database of species responses/management options to mitigate drought/post-drought recovery at different scales, and management guidelines on coping with drought/water scarcity at different scales.

Planned Impact

This research will have high impact in theoretical, policy and practical terms in local/national/international contexts. In policy terms, drought is now one of the major risks facing the UK. The project aims to mitigate drought impacts, and through a new innovative multi-stakeholder decision-making utility, to make different stakeholders more resilient to drought risk and drought events.
The project's impact strategy is driven and strengthened by the engaged nature of the research process. Key target groups/beneficiaries within, and beyond, those immediately engaged within the project have been identified. These include: stakeholders working at local and regional levels in different domains (health and wellbeing, urban design/built environment, agriculture/horticulture, utilities, government, business, tourism and ecosystem services) to manage the impacts of drought and water scarcity in the 7 case-study catchments; educational organisations (formal/informal); wider inter-professional groups in the UK with interests/concerns in drought risk management/mitigation of impacts, including communities and the general public.
Developing organisational stakeholders and communities that are resilient to living with drought risk and water scarcity, and resilient to future drought is of the highest priority. A multi-stakeholder shared recognition of drought risk, and a developing attitude of coping/living with flood events, are vital components of drought risk planning/resilience. This research will make a significant contribution to drought policy discourses and practices in the way it brings different stakeholder drought narratives into thinking about and developing drought resilience.
The interdisciplinary and narrative based research methods are designed to enhance and dovetail with the impact strategy giving opportunities for new and innovative approaches to achieving impact. This integrates: how mesocosms and social media tools can engage new/different audiences, and how the inclusion of lay voices and narrative data might incentivise the policy process. Policy makers have to balance all these competing interests - so, rather than handing policymakers the science, the project supplies 'the whole data package'. For further detail on beneficiaries, benefits and methods, see the Pathways to impact document. These include:
- Project partners and stakeholders working at local and regional levels in different domains (water supply, health and wellbeing, urban design/built environment, agriculture/forestry, government, business, tourism and ecosystem services) and the policy/governance communities (Environment Agency, SEPA, National Resources Wales and local/regional/national levels)
- General public and communities (e.g. Local Resilience Forums with responsibilities for community lead adaptation planning)
- Scientists and artists working as part of different professional organisations (e.g. environmental regulators/wildlife conservation)
- Individuals and collectives of creative practitioners and cultural activists whose work focuses on related environmental and sustainability issues
- Educational organisations (schools, further/higher education but also less formal learning).
The case-study based research design will identify 7 catchments with a wide range of physical/socio-economic-cultural characteristics that will form a platform for wider stakeholder engagement across the UK. The project will have an integrated dissemination/impact strategy that targets different stakeholders for awareness, information and action for behaviour change. Impact will be delivered by on-going dialogue/exchange; a culture of co-production of knowledge, and working with key organisational gatekeepers/ communities in catchments and beyond. Impact strategies will include website/social media; open access research outputs for end users; participatory activities (seminars, workshops, conference) and a science-storytelling e-workbook for schools.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Animation of DiCaSM model Output for Stakeholders 
Description For engagement purpose, animation plots of model results (stream flow, recharge, evaporation, soil moisture deficit, wetness index, etc.) have been successful in engaging participants in DRY project meetings. A code has been added to the DiCaSM model and a supporting software to capture the model animation plots and placing them into presentation were integrated. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The animation plots of model results (stream flow, recharge, evaporation, soil moisture deficit, wetness index, etc.) have been successful in engaging participants in DRY project meetings. A comparison of dry versus wet year side by side in animation plots sent a clear message to audiences and triggered good feedback and fruitful discussion. 
 
Description Identifying the drought periods and quantifying the river flows and ground water recharge within 7 catchments from north to south and from east to west of the UK.
Developing new drought Index based on actual values of net rainfall and evaporation instead of the commonly used index which is based on potential values. In addition, The scaled soil moisture of the root zone presented as a wetness Index ranges from 0 to 1, proved to be a good indicator for dry years. These two indicators will play an important role in identifying drought and severity of the drought in the future. The climate change scenarios up to 2099 indicated that, the high emission scenario for 2080's indicate more frequent drought event likely to take place in Eden and other Catchments. The results also indicated that , there are seasonal variations with summer getting dryer with low stream flow and recharge taking place.
Exploitation Route Will lead to better understanding and identification of the occurrence of the drought and severity of the drought now and in the future and drought impact on water resources availability. The latter will help water authorities to derive a plan that takes into account the drought events and how to sustainably manage the water resources now and in the future.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Energy,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology,Transport

URL http://dryproject.co.uk/
 
Description CEH has set up an ecological experiment at two sites in each river catchment. On each site there are 15 plots called 'mesocosms', which are used to measure the effects of drought on grassland plants and insects and will be scaled-up to generate catchment-level information. At each site, 12 mesocosms have roofs which intercept 50% of rainfall and simulate drought. 6 have roofs which allow rain through (to monitor the influence of the frame on plant growth) and 12 have no roof or frame ('controls' which allow us to compare plant growth in the absence of drought). The experiment was set up in autumn 2015 and citizen science data collection began in February 2016. Volunteering summary ? Since the start of 2016 eighteen citizen scientist volunteers have contributed over 160 hours of their time collecting data at the Simms Hill site in the Frome catchment. ? Citizen scientist volunteers visited several times a month during 2016, with weekly visits during the summer. ? They collected data on plant height, flowering dates and presence of pollinators, worked in the lab, helped with site maintenance and recorded their digital stories. Preliminary results were published as two pages flyer "The DRY Project Citizen Science Summary for 2016 (P. Ramirez) 25.1.2017 " http://dryproject.co.uk/
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Environment,Healthcare
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Title DiCaSM input databases for 7 catchments: Bevils Lean, Fowey, Don, Eden, Frome, Ebbw and Pang 
Description Established 7 databases for the 7 study catchments to include for each 1km grid square and for 1961-2012 period, the following: 1. Soil types and hydraulic properties within each 1km grid square 2. Land cover distribution within each 1km grid square 3. Rainfall distribution 4. Meteorological distributed data (wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, radiation, Vapour pressure) 5. Land cover parameters 6. Elevation 7. Observed stream flows and stream geometry 8. Limited data for some catchments on abstraction and discharge into rivers. The data were quality controlled then tested using the Distributed Catchment Scale hydrological Model, DiCaSM. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The databases were used as input to the DiCaSM model. The model results indicated that between 1961 and 2012 , the 7 catchments were subjected to a number of drought events. This is largely based on the model time series of rainfall, stream flows and evaporation supported by observations. Excellent hydrological modelling work took place using such data basis. Three catchments (Fowey, Ebbw and Bevills Leam) modelling work have been completed and the remaining four are underway. The modelling work evaluated the surface water and ground water availability during drought periods and successfully identified the drought years. 
URL http://dryproject.co.uk/
 
Title DiCaSM output databases for 6 catchments: Fowey, Don, Eden, Frome, Ebbw and Pang 
Description DiCaSM model results are now saved in results SQL databases. This includes results of 1961-2012 period, baseline 1961-1991 period, climate change scenario periods of 2010-2039, 2040-2069, 2070-2099 periods (each period has 3 emission level scenarios, high, medium & low) using UKCP09 scenarios of Joint Probability and weather generator. . 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The database will help identifying the possible future Drought frequency for different future years and under different emission scenarios as well as the magnitude of the change in surface and groundwater resources in each study catchment. These important information will help water resources managers and policy makers to develop suitable management schemes for water use by different sectors. . 
 
Title The Hydrological Distributed Catchment Scale Model, DiCaSM 
Description The Distributed Catchment Scale model, DiCaSM, is physically based model, distributed (default 1km by 1km grid squares), calculates the hydrological cycle elements: Evaporation, plant transpiration, runoff, recharge, infiltration, stream flow, soil moisture and plant growth. Recently the model has been adapted to the 7 study catchments by: 1.Adding two options to calculate base flow 2.Accounting for abstractions, irrigation and discharges from other sources such as treated wastewater 3.Using SQL server instead of Microsoft Access 4.Adding fast calibration option 5.Adding more figure plotting facility e.g. base flow 6.Adding two extra "Goodness of fit parameters" to the classical Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, NSE namely the coefficient of determination, R2 and the NSE based on logarithmic values of the observed and simulated stream flows 7. Adding monthly climate change factors to the model and creating a separate tab for climate change. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Preliminary results of the DiCaSM model results have been presented to the Local Advisory Group (LAG) in each catchment, discussed and the feedback was great. the LAG is composed of stakeholders and includes the regional water company, the local Environment Agency, EA , the local representative of the National Farmers Union, NFU, Drought and Flood forums, Environmental group, small businesses and local schools. Every 6 months, a LAG meeting is held locally at the catchment and the modelling results are presented to the LAG's of the 7 catchments: Bevils Lean, Fowey, Don, Eden, Frome, Ebbw and Pang. The modelling results so far have been well received, stimulated discussions and suggestions. Excellent impact so far. The Hydrological modelling of Fowey, Bevills Leam and Ebbw catchments have been completed and these three catchments are now running with UKCP09 climate change future scenarios. 
URL http://dryproject.co.uk/
 
Description Citizen Science and MSc student projects in collaboration with UWE 
Organisation University of the West of England
Department Department of Nursing and Midwifery
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution CEH has set up an ecological experiment at two sites in each river catchment. On each site there are 15 plots called 'mesocosms', which are used to measure the effects of drought on grassland plants and insects and will be scaled-up to generate catchment-level information. At each site, 12 mesocosms have roofs which intercept 50% of rainfall and simulate drought. 6 have roofs which allow rain through (to monitor the influence of the frame on plant growth) and 12 have no roof or frame ('controls' which allow us to compare plant growth in the absence of drought). The experiment was set up in autumn 2015 and citizen science data collection began in February 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Volunteering summary ? Since the start of 2016 eighteen citizen scientist volunteers have contributed over 160 hours of their time collecting data at the Simms Hill site in the Frome catchment. ? Citizen scientist volunteers visited several times a month during 2016, with weekly visits during the summer. ? They collected data on plant height, flowering dates and presence of pollinators, worked in the lab, helped with site maintenance and recorded their digital stories MSc student of UWE are carrying out research projects at the Bristol sites using the facilities of CEH. Good partnership and cooperation practice.
Impact A flyer (2 pages) summarizing the preliminary results of the Citizen Science volunteers was produced and made available at the DRY project web site. The title of the Flyer is: The DRY Project Citizen Science Summary for 2016 (P. Ramirez) 25.1.2017
Start Year 2015
 
Title IHMS-Integrated Hydrological Modelling System. 
Description The Integrated Hydrological Modelling System (IHMS) has been developed to study the impact of changes in climate, land use and water management on groundwater and seawater intrusion (SWI) into coastal areas. The system represents the combination of three models, which can, if required, be run separately. It has been designed to assess the combined impact of climate, land use and groundwater abstraction changes on river, drainage and groundwater flows, groundwater levels and, where appropriate, SWI. The approach is interdisciplinary and reflects an integrated water management approach. The system comprises three packages: the Distributed Catchment Scale Model, DiCaSM, MODFLOW and SWI models. In addition to estimating all water balance components, DiCaSM, produces the recharge data that are used as input to the groundwater flow model of the US Geological Survey, MODFLOW. The latter subsequently generates the head distribution and groundwater flows that are used as input to the SWI model. Thus, any changes in land use, rainfall, water management, abstraction, etc. at the surface are first handled by DiCaSM, then by MODFLOW and finally by the SWI. The three models operate at different spatial and temporal scales and a facility (interface utilities between models) to aggregate/disaggregate input/output data to meet a desired spatial and temporal scale was developed allowing smooth and easy communication between the three models. MODFLOW and SWI are in the public domain. DiCaSM, has been developed for unsaturated zone at Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH and equally important, is the interfacing utilities between the three models. DiCaSM simulates a number of hydrological processes: rainfall interception, evapotranspiration, surface runoff, infiltration, soil water movement in the root zone, plant water uptake, crop growth, stream flow and groundwater recharge. Input requirements include distributed data sets of rainfall, climate data, land use, soil types and elevation. The model produces distributed and time series output of all water balance components including potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, rainfall interception, infiltration, plant water uptake, transpiration, soil water content, soil moisture (SM) deficit, groundwater recharge rate, stream flow and surface runoff. The first version was released in 2010 ( Ragab and Bromley, 2010) but under the Dry project, it has been subjected to further developments that included: 1. Adding two options to calculate base flow 2. Accounting for abstractions, irrigation and discharges from other sources such as treated wastewater 3. Using SQL server instead of Microsoft Access 4. Adding fast calibration option 6. Adding more figure plotting facility e.g. base flow 7. Adding two extra "Goodness of fit parameters" to the classical Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, NSE namely the coefficient of determination, R2 and the NSE based on logarithmic values of the observed and simulated stream flows 8. Adding a special tab for monthly climate change factors (rainfall, temperature, radiation, wind speed, vapor pressure) 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The early version of 2010 has been applied on the Pang catchment in the UK and on other catchments in Cyprus, Italy and Brazil to study the impact of climate change and land use changes on water resources. The studies highlighted the gap between supply and demand in those catchments up to 2050. Also quantified the possible impact of climate change on water resources. Particular interest was given to impact of changing land use to account for more durum wheat areas in Italy, use of Sugar Cane as biofuel in Brazil on water resources. The results were published and communicated by the National Researchers to their authorities in those countries for actions. More details can be found at: Ragab et al. 2010, D'Agostino et al. 2010, Montenegro and Ragab 2010, Montenegro and Ragab 2011. 
URL http://dryproject.co.uk/
 
Title IHMS-Integrated Hydrological Modelling System. (2018) with added in Climate Change Scenarios and Uncertainty Analysis. 
Description The early version dedicated for the Hydrological processes at catchment scale (2015-2017) did not include a code for sophisticated climate change scenarios or uncertainty analysis of model stream flows In late 2017- early 2018, a code to help selecting the relevant flows out of numerous number of iterations for the Uncertainty level of model results calculation by the GLUE methodology "Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation". This included setting up a threshold value of Nash Sutcliff Efficiency factor above which the model will keep the results of the relevant iteration and discard those below the threshold. In late 2017- early 2018, a code to allow the model to use the Climate change scenarios and data generated by the UKCP09 Weather Generator.. This includes runs of 100's of realization input files of climate change scenarios (three , 30 years periods: 2020's (2010-2039), 2050's (2040-2069), 2080's (2070-2099) and three emission scenarios (high, medium & low) for each period. to study the climate changes impact on catchment hydrology using the 1961-1990 as a baseline. Model software was adapted to run 900 input files per catchment and record 900 output files. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The current version 2018 has now two new applications: Uncertainty level of model results calculation by the GLUE methodology "Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation". A second feature is to allow the model to use the Climate change scenarios and data generated by the UKCP09 Weather Generator. These new features are important for decision makers and water resources planners. 
 
Description Bevills Leam Catchment Local Advisory Group, LAG Drought science update 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios.Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description British Innovation and Drought Solution meeting with South Africa Government Officials, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact presenting DRY project and its results to the South Africa Minister of Water Resources and his Team in a meeting hosted by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Westminster, London. Regional Minister Meeting - British Innovation and Drought Solution.
Most significant outcome/impact: Possible research and capacity building collaboration between UK and South Africa
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Citizen Science vegetation assessment Eden Catchment 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Training in vegetation assessment and assessment of grassland experiments.
Most significant outcome/impact: Development of skills and experience of field work. Opportunities for discussion of drought and information exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Conference on water resources management under climate change, Luxor Egypt 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact presenting DRY project and its results with particular focus on the impact of climate change scenarios of UKCP09 on water resources availability up to 2099. Most significant outcome/impact: Possible research and capacity building collaboration between UK and Egypt.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Don Catchment Local Advisory Group, LAG Drought science update, Sheffield 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback from stakeholders to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Don Catchment Science day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Discussion of drought risk and local narratives on drought in the Don catchment. Demonstration of grassland drought experiments. Reservoir walk and demonstration of grassland mesocosms. Most significant outcome/impact: Information exchange on local drought issues with diverse stakeholders. Contributing to the development of songs and narratives for communication exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Drought Risk Scenario Modelling [Stakeholders Competency Group, SCG meeting] 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on improved visualisation of drought risk modelling outputs as an aid to improved communication. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback to improve drought risk communication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Drought in the Fowey catchment: Past, Present and Future [Environment Group Workshop] 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presented historic and potential future drought risk in the Fowey catchment, Cornwall, including hydrological model development and climate and land use scenario modelling. Stimulus for narrative public engagement. Publicising project locally and seeking feedback. Most significant outcome/impact: Lead to improvements to public engagement strategy to develop 'bite-sized' science as part of DRY.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Ebbw Catchment Local Advisory Group,LAG Drought science update, Ebbw valley, Wales 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback from stakeholders to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Eden Catchmnet Local Advisory Group, LAG meeting Drought Risk Scenario Modelling, Fife, Scotland 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on drought risk modelling under climate change scenarios for the Eden catchment. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback on how to communicate drought with a diverse group of stakeholders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018
 
Description Fowey Catchment Local Advisory Group, LAG Drought science update 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Frome Catchment Local Advisory Group, LAG Drought science update, South Gloucestershire 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback from stakeholders to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Impacts of the climatic change on the hydrology of the Eden catchment in Scotland, UK using DiCaSM model approach-submitted to the European Geophysical Union, EGU 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Abstract has been accepted and drought results will be shared at EGU 2018 conference, which will provide an opportunity to share the results with a wide range of audience at international conference and to promote CEH research activities at international level. Most significant outcome/impact: Possible research collaboration and Publicising project and CEH models internationally. Source: URL https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/EGU2018-9346.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Local Advisory Group, LAG regular meetings every 6 months at the 7 study catchments 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the Dry project we hold 6 monthly regular meeting at each study catchment: Bevils Lean, Fowey, Don, Eden, Frome, Ebbw and Pang. These meeting include the stakeholders, general public, the local Environment Agency officer, the local water company officer, the local farmers, the local Environment enthusiasts, small businesses, local school representative and local ex professional hydrologists. We present the modelling results, identifying problems and gap in our information and understanding. These often lead to a debate and most of the times, we receive feedback and extra support from the LAG. In 2016, a member of the Pang catchment LAG organized a guided tour to the gauging stations and showed where the stream flow of the Pang can be affected by the River Thames during the high flow periods. This also was followed by receiving reports on the historical flows at several gauging stations from a new member of the LAG.
Example of last year meeting March 2016-February 2017:
Stakeholders meetings
i. Presentation to the national Stakeholders meeting at UWE on June 9, 2016.
ii. Presentations every 6 months to local Stakeholders. Local Advisory Group "LAG" meetings:
? Eden catchment: May 19, 2016 and February 6, 2017, SCG meeting , February 7, 2017
? Pang catchment: July 6, 2016 and February 17, 2017
? Fowey catchment: February 18, 2016 and November 1, 2016
? Bevills Leam catchment: July 5, 2016 and January 17, 2017
? Frome catchment: June 7, 2016 and January 24, 2017
? Don catchment: March 7, 2016 and October 11, 2016
? Ebbw catchment: July 4, 2016, January 19, 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017
URL http://dryproject.co.uk/
 
Description Pang Catchment Local Advisory Group, LAG Drought science update, Oxfordshire 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Update on progress with drought risk modelling, with opportunities to co-develop methodology via feedback on potential drought impact indices and future climate, land use and water management scenarios. Most significant outcome/impact: Feedback from stakeholders to ensure the impact indices and scenarios are locally relevant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Public Engagement Don Catchment 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Information exchange discussion of potential drought indicators river walk, tree measurements in Graves park, follow up and reporting back on narratives and songs as communication from June science day. Development of skills and experience of field work. Opportunities for discussion of drought and information exchange. Discussion of songs and means of communication and drought information exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Seminar based on Eden results at UFMS, Campo Grande, Brazil 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation based on DiCaSM & SALTMED model results, this provided an opportunity of research collaboration with the university, and received a very positive feedback.
Most significant outcome/impact: Collaboration and Publicising project and CEH models internationally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017